Venture capital (VC) funds are an alternative asset class that can provide investors with the opportunity to invest in early-stage and growth-stage companies that have high potential for growth and returns. While VC funds can be a great way to access new and exciting investment opportunities, it is important to understand the pros and cons, as well as the key considerations for potential investors.

Basic Definitions

  • LP: Limited partner, an investor in a VC fund. LPs can include high net worth individuals, family offices, endowments, pension funds, and other institutional investors. LPs are passive investors and do not take an active role in the management of the fund. If you’re looking at investing in VC funds, you’re the LP.
  • GP: General partner, the entity responsible for managing a VC fund. The GP is responsible for making investment decisions, managing the fund's operations, and communicating with the LPs. The GP is typically a team of experienced venture capitalists, who are responsible for sourcing and executing investments in startups and early stage companies.
  • Fund Size: The total amount of capital that a VC fund has raised from its limited partners (LPs). This can range from a few million dollars to several billion dollars. A larger fund size can indicate that the VC firm has a good reputation and track record, and that it has been able to attract a large number of LPs.
  • Fund Term: The length of time that a VC fund is open for investment. This can range from a few years to a decade or more (fund term is typically 10 years). The fund term can be an important consideration for investors, as it affects the length of time that the investor's capital will be locked up.
  • Administration Fees: The fees charged by the fund's general partner (GP) for managing the fund's operations. These management fees can range from 1-2% of the fund's capital, and are usually paid by the LPs. The fees are used to cover the costs of running the fund, such as legal fees, accounting fees, and office expenses.
  • Carry: The share of the fund's profits that the GP is entitled to. This is also known as carried interest. Typically, the GP will be entitled to 20-30% of the fund's profits, while the LPs will receive the remaining 70-80%. Carry is a way for the GP to align its interests with those of the LPs, as the GP's profit is tied to the fund's performance.
  • Deployment Time: The time it takes for the fund to deploy the capital it has raised. This can vary depending on the fund's investment strategy and the opportunities available. Some funds may deploy capital quickly, while others may take a more measured approach.
  • Commitments: The amount of capital that LPs have committed to invest in a VC fund. Commitments are not the same as actual investments, as LPs may not be required to contribute all of their committed capital until it is called for by the GP.
  • Capital Calls: The requests from the GP for LPs to contribute capital to the fund, as needed. Capital calls are made when the GP has identified an investment opportunity and needs additional capital to make the investment.
  • ROIC: Return on invested capital, the rate of return on the capital invested in a VC fund. ROIC is a measure of the profitability of the fund's investments. A high ROIC indicates that the fund is generating strong returns on its VC investments.
  • IRR: Internal rate of return, a measure of the profitability of a VC fund. IRR is a commonly used metric to evaluate the performance of a VC fund. It takes into account the time value of money, and provides a single number that represents the fund's overall performance. A higher IRR indicates that the fund is generating better returns for its LPs.

Pros

  • Potential for high returns: VC funds can potentially outperform public markets due to the high-growth potential of the companies they invest in. The companies that venture capital funds invest in are typically not publicly traded and have high potential for growth. This can lead to higher returns for investors, as these companies can grow rapidly and generate significant revenue.
  • Access to new and exciting opportunities: VC funds provide investors with access to educational and interesting investment opportunities, as well as exposure to bleeding-edge technology and innovation. This can include new and emerging technologies, business models, and industries. Investing in a VC fund can be a way to gain access to these opportunities and stay on the cutting edge of innovation.
  • Networking opportunities: Investing in a VC fund can provide investors with the opportunity to network with fellow LPs and angel investors and gain insights into their investment strategies. This can include learning about new opportunities and trends, as well as gaining access to the GP's network of entrepreneurs, executives, and other industry experts.
  • Flexibility: VC funds can provide investors with the flexibility to invest alongside the fund if there is more room, or to invest in a specific company within the fund. This allows investors to have more control over their investments, and to tailor their investments to their specific goals and risk tolerance.
  • Aspirational: Investing in a VC fund can provide investors with the opportunity to be a part of something bigger and more aspirational than investing in public markets. This can include investing in companies that are working on improving the world or solving big problems.

Cons

  • Long period of illiquidity: VC funds typically have a long period of illiquidity, meaning that investors' capital is locked up for a long time and may not be easily accessible. This can be a significant consideration for investors, as it means that they will not be able to access their capital until the fund is liquidated or until an exit is achieved.
  • Power law returns: VC funds tend to follow power law returns, where most VC funds underperform the market and the top few generate most of the gains. This means that many VC funds do not generate positive returns, and that the majority of the returns are generated by a small number of top-performing funds.
  • Difficulty of getting into top funds: It can be difficult for outsiders to get into the top venture capital firms. The best VC funds are often oversubscribed and have a long waiting list of investors. This can make it challenging for investors to gain access to the top-performing funds, and can limit the opportunities for investors to generate strong returns.

Considerations

  • Why the best founders will take money from this particular VC: The most important consideration for investors is understanding why the best founders will choose to raise money from a particular VC fund. This will help investors to identify the funds that have the best reputation, network, and track record. Funds that have a strong reputation, a successful track record of investing in similar companies, and a strong network of industry contacts are more likely to attract the best founders.
  • Past fund returns: Investors should research the past returns of a VC fund to get a sense of its performance. This can include looking at the fund's historical returns, its portfolio companies, and the exits it has achieved. This information can provide insight into the fund's investment strategy, its track record of success, and its ability to generate returns for its LPs.
  • Reference calls with founders and other LPs: Investors should speak to other LPs, founders and entrepreneurs to ask about their experience with the fund, and to get a sense of the reputation of the fund. This can provide valuable insights into the fund's investment process, its management, and its ability to generate returns for its LPs.
  • Opaque operations and lack of reporting: Another consideration with investing in VC funds is that most VC fund operations and venture capital investments are opaque and shrouded in secrecy. 

    Unlike public companies and funds, they don’t undergo strict auditing and reporting procedures. This lack of transparency can lead to poor governance and bad decisions. 

    For example, during the recent FTX investigation, it was revealed that SBF and Alameda had taken LP positions in VC funds that were FTX investors. This can lead to conflicts of interest and it can make it difficult for LPs to monitor the fund's activities and performance. Therefore, it is important for investors to do their due diligence to ensure that the fund's operations are transparent and that the GP is acting in the best interest of the LPs.

Conclusion

Venture capital (VC) funds can be a great way for investors to access new and exciting investment opportunities and generate high returns. However, it is important for potential investors to understand the pros, cons, and key considerations before investing in a VC fund.

The basic definitions, such as Fund Size, Fund Term, Administration Fees, Carry, Deployment Time, LP, GP, Commitments, Capital Calls, ROIC, and IRR, are important to understand in order to evaluate the performance and the fund's operations. The pros of investing in a VC fund include potential for high returns, access to new and exciting opportunities, networking opportunities, flexibility, and being a part of something aspirational. The cons include a long period of illiquidity, power law returns, and difficulty of getting into top funds.

When considering investing in a VC fund, it is important to understand why the best founders will take money from a particular VC fund, research the past fund returns, and speak to other LPs, founders, and entrepreneurs to get a sense of the reputation of the fund. Additionally, it is important to keep in mind that most VC fund operations are opaque and shrouded in secrecy. Unlike public companies and funds, they don’t undergo strict auditing and reporting procedures. This could lead to poor governance and bad decisions.

In conclusion, investing in a VC fund can be a great way to access new and exciting opportunities and generate high returns, but it is important to understand the risks and do the necessary research before making a decision. It is important to be aware of the pros, cons, and key considerations, as well as the fund's operations and reputation, to make an informed decision.

Start Monitoring and Managing All Your Venture Capital Investments with Kubera

Ready to diversify and boost the health of your portfolio, insulate your assets and your wealth from stock market ups and downs, cut through bureaucracy to invest quickly and creatively, and invest in things that you’re genuinely passionate about?

Then it’s time for you to get started with investing in alternative assets such as Venture Capital Funds today. Kubera is ready and waiting to help you dive into diverse, modern, alternative assets and track them seamlessly with ease.

Request a Demo

Contact Kubera Sales
Manage wealth on your own?  Try Kubera Personal (14 days for $1)

Request a Demo

Contact Kubera Sales
Manage wealth on your own?  Try Kubera Personal (14 days for $1)